Getting rid of the mask

On May 13th, the CDC announced that it is now ok for those fully vaccinated not to wear masks.  The vaccine protects against the variants and reduces the chance of having major symptoms if you get the virus.  It is still suggested to wear masks on planes, trains, buses and in hospitals.

My first response was to revolt.  No I am not ready to stop wearing it. How do I know I am protected.  There was a time when I forgot to switch my sunglasses with my regular glasses, but remembered my mask.  

The mask has been part of my life for the last 15 months.  I did have a homemade mask briefly.  But it was too hot so I went to the masks which look like the one above.  I wear one for a few outings and then get a new one. I thought about getting a mask of certain colors or with a logo or picture but it was not worth the cost to me and I really didn’t want to make a statement. The mask helped keep me from touching my face and when I had to sneeze it protected other people. And of course it protected against Covid along with washing hands and social distancing.

When I received my second Covid vaccine I felt a sense of relief that I had something else to help fight the virus. Of course the mask is annoying, hot and my glasses steam up whenever I wear it. However, I did not get sick during the flu season and my allergies were not nearly as bad this spring. On the other hand it will be nice to not wear one.

Until more people are vaccinated I will probably err on the side of caution. I probably will continue to wear it to the grocery store and at least entering and going to the bathroom in restaurants. I will pick it up again in the winter to protect against flu viruses and of course continuing washing my hands and sanitizing as I have gotten better at over the last year.

Yes, it is time to reduce mask use but it won’t be completely absent from my life.

Stay healthy out there.

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Snow Days

Over the past week southwest Ohio has been hit with snow. We received about an inch of rain/ice and then four inches of snow. A day or two later we received three more inches along with temperatures in the teens. Don’t get me wrong Ohio does get snow in the winter and we have cold days. It’s just that we haven’t seen it for the past two or three years. People I talked to were excited about the snow and cold. Cold temps mean we have sunshine too. It’s just after a year of covid, covid, covid it is nice and almost normal to hear about freezing temperatures and snow.
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It’s the small things that get us through.

This past week my mother in-law passed away at the age of 90. Over the past few years she has been deteriorating and has been in and out of the hospital many times over the last year and a half. I have known her for thirty of her years. I was sad that she had suffered so much during her last years and as I thought about my memories with her I had no strong memories and that also made me sad. I then started thinking smaller. It is big that she gave birth to her son; my husband of thirty years. She always remembered my birthday with a card and check. She did the same at Christmas. She always remember her grandkids’ birthdays as well. Over the next few days and months other things may be remembered. Perhaps it is the small things that best help us celebrate a life lived and grieve a life lost.

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How to Know if Your Memoir Is Boring — BREVITY’s Nonfiction Blog

What happened to you was powerful—but will anyone else want to read it? And which events from your life go in the book, anyway? Do you need more backstory? Or more action? Is the reader going to get it? The foul-mouthed creators of South Park and The Book of Mormon know the answer. You might […]

How to Know if Your Memoir Is Boring — BREVITY’s Nonfiction Blog
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National Author’s Day and NaNoWriMo — The Unapologetic Bookworm

Good morning, everyone! I can’t believe that it’s already the first of November! Today is National Author’s Day, which is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the work of your favorite authors. Here are a few ideas for how you could celebrate National Author’s Day… Set aside some time to read a book by your favorite […]

National Author’s Day and NaNoWriMo — The Unapologetic Bookworm

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Dealing with that Inner Voice of Criticism — Something to Ponder About

How do you treat yourself? We are often harshest in our treatment of ourselves in the way our inner voice reprimands us for making mistakes. Rather than an objective assessment of our actions, we strive for perfection in ourselves, and are disappointed or angry with ourselves if we cannot attain that desired standard. Source: http://forestwoodfolkart.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/58006-1ye5vss3wrvp7nv7b51ldzw.png %5B…%5D

Dealing with that Inner Voice of Criticism — Something to Ponder About
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July Reads

It’s been a month of intense reading. I am determined to increase my understanding of the issues of racism facing America so I can make better decisions. Calvin Baker’s book – A More Perfect ReUnion is an incredible book about the history of racism in this country. The book Passing by Nella Larsen was written in the 1920’s and is as important today as it was then. The Pale Rider covers the social and cultural aspects of the 1918 Influenza pandemic. Along with John Barry’s book the Great Influenza this gives an incredible background on what went on in 1918.

I am ready for some lighter reads.