Featured

The Journey Continues

It was time.  I was waiting for the perfect moment to turn in my paperwork to announce my intent to retire.  After telling my supervisor, I brought cupcakes in for my co-workers with a note announcing my retirement.  Over the previous six months there had been several announcements about pending births that were met with enthusiasm and rounds of congratulations. Three hours passed, I received one congratulations from a co-worker.  Some never said anything and another was jealous.  No mention was ever made of the years I had worked or the contributions I had made.  Throughout the coming months I received comments such as “I wish I was retiring” or “where will you be moving to”.  To which I responded “you do know you have to be older to retire or very wealthy” and “there are no plans to move right now”.    It was a relief to turn in my paperwork.  After months of thinking about retiring and not saying anything I could now talk about it.  After a few years of uncertainty whether I would have a job I could retire with grace and on my own terms.  

The concept of retirement meant a change in how I worked.  It certainly did not mean I would sit around on a rocking chair overlooking a beach or in my case the mountains day after day.  I knew I needed to stay busy and find activities which had meaning to me.  The first three years of retirement were an adjustment.   At times I felt stuck, uncertain and perhaps a little depressed that I didn’t know what I wanted to do despite having created a list of things that interested me.  The first three years of retirement included our son graduating from college, some health issues, a pandemic and uncertainty as how I was going to navigate this change.

History has its eyes on us — Retirementally Challenged

This is part of the poem, The Hill We Climb, by Amanda Gorman. Gorman will read this poem today at the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. Gorman, 22, is continuing a tradition that includes poets such as Robert Frost and Maya Angelou, and is the youngest poet in recent memory to deliver a […]

History has its eyes on us — Retirementally Challenged
Featured

It’s the small things that get us through.

This past week my mother in-law passed away at the age of 90. Over the past few years she has been deteriorating and has been in and out of the hospital many times over the last year and a half. I have known her for thirty of her years. I was sad that she had suffered so much during her last years and as I thought about my memories with her I had no strong memories and that also made me sad. I then started thinking smaller. It is big that she gave birth to her son; my husband of thirty years. She always remembered my birthday with a card and check. She did the same at Christmas. She always remember her grandkids’ birthdays as well. Over the next few days and months other things may be remembered. Perhaps it is the small things that best help us celebrate a life lived and grieve a life lost.

Featured

Latest Read

I am trying to broaden my reading this year. I typically read historical fiction which is still my favorite. With all the political upheaval I am planning on reading more nonfiction. I’m hoping that by having a better understanding I can quiet my mind’s questions of “why this is happening” or “why is misinformation so prevalent”. I also want to read more genres that I often ignore.

I started off the year reading The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue. I found the first part of the book boring and very repetitive. As I often do when a book is like that but yet I still kind of want to know what happens I will start jumping around, which I did. I landed in the middle and began to become intrigued with the book and stayed with it until the end. The story line is of a girl, Addie who makes a deal with a dark god to live her life in freedom. Unfortunately this means others will not remember her when she sees them again. Until she meets Henry in 2014 who remembers her. The book parallels Addie’s life from her birth in the late 1600’s with her life in 2014. The author has done an excellent job connecting this parallel timelines. The ending was a surprise, though it shouldn’t have been. Still not sure if I liked the ending but overall this was an excellent read.