Getting rid of the mask

On May 13th, the CDC announced that it is now ok for those fully vaccinated not to wear masks.  The vaccine protects against the variants and reduces the chance of having major symptoms if you get the virus.  It is still suggested to wear masks on planes, trains, buses and in hospitals.

My first response was to revolt.  No I am not ready to stop wearing it. How do I know I am protected.  There was a time when I forgot to switch my sunglasses with my regular glasses, but remembered my mask.  

The mask has been part of my life for the last 15 months.  I did have a homemade mask briefly.  But it was too hot so I went to the masks which look like the one above.  I wear one for a few outings and then get a new one. I thought about getting a mask of certain colors or with a logo or picture but it was not worth the cost to me and I really didn’t want to make a statement. The mask helped keep me from touching my face and when I had to sneeze it protected other people. And of course it protected against Covid along with washing hands and social distancing.

When I received my second Covid vaccine I felt a sense of relief that I had something else to help fight the virus. Of course the mask is annoying, hot and my glasses steam up whenever I wear it. However, I did not get sick during the flu season and my allergies were not nearly as bad this spring. On the other hand it will be nice to not wear one.

Until more people are vaccinated I will probably err on the side of caution. I probably will continue to wear it to the grocery store and at least entering and going to the bathroom in restaurants. I will pick it up again in the winter to protect against flu viruses and of course continuing washing my hands and sanitizing as I have gotten better at over the last year.

Yes, it is time to reduce mask use but it won’t be completely absent from my life.

Stay healthy out there.

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